Jump to content


Photo

Making light gun heavier to reduce recoil


  • Please log in to reply
5 replies to this topic

#1 yury

yury

    .22

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 31 posts
10
  • LocationEdmond, OK

Posted 24 September 2017 - 03:26 PM

Based on information published in the Front Sight Magazine about recoil Sep 2017, https://uspsa.org/magazine/2017-09/#76, and one from Nov 2016. Guy Neill explains what is Free Recoil Energy (FRE), how to calculate it and how it changes while shooting. Good stuff.

So… If I’m reading it right, a light gun has greater FRE than a heavier gun for the same ammo. Since the bullets might weight something, especially in 19rd magazine, it might be a difference in 0.5 ft-lbf (0.67 joules) in FRE when loading 10 instead of 19 rounds. (For comparison 1 joule is an energy of clapping hand)

A beginner needs to take any (un)fair advantage they can get :) Does it make sense for them to:

  1. fully load magazines all the time, e.g. even when stage needs 4 rounds?
  2. 
start using heavier bullets, e.g. 147gr instead of 115gr in 9mm case?
  3. add something heavy to the production gun magazine — the USPSA rules does not forbid such mods?

 



#2 Wall

Wall

    El Diablo

  • Administrators
  • 12,674 posts
3,567
  • LocationNW OKC

Posted 24 September 2017 - 03:55 PM

 

Based on information published in the Front Sight Magazine about recoil Sep 2017, https://uspsa.org/magazine/2017-09/#76, and one from Nov 2016. Guy Neill explains what is Free Recoil Energy (FRE), how to calculate it and how it changes while shooting. Good stuff.

So… If I’m reading it right, a light gun has greater FRE than a heavier gun for the same ammo. Since the bullets might weight something, especially in 19rd magazine, it might be a difference in 0.5 ft-lbf (0.67 joules) in FRE when loading 10 instead of 19 rounds. (For comparison 1 joule is an energy of clapping hand)

A beginner needs to take any (un)fair advantage they can get :) Does it make sense for them to:

  1. fully load magazines all the time, e.g. even when stage needs 4 rounds?
  2. 
start using heavier bullets, e.g. 147gr instead of 115gr in 9mm case?
  3. add something heavy to the production gun magazine — the USPSA rules does not forbid such mods?

 

1st, always load your mags to division capacity, even if the stage calls for 4 rounds.

2nd, while a heavier gun will recoil less, it also transitions slower.

Not a huge deal for uspsa where there is usually movement between arrays, but very big for steel challenge where transitions are key to a faster time.



#3 ShootinPeepin

ShootinPeepin

    .22

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 17 posts
9
  • LocationTampa, Florida

Posted 26 September 2017 - 02:35 AM

1st, always load your mags to division capacity, even if the stage calls for 4 rounds.

2nd, while a heavier gun will recoil less, it also transitions slower.

Not a huge deal for uspsa where there is usually movement between arrays, but very big for steel challenge where transitions are key to a faster time.

I see. That clears things up. This was a detailed explanation. Thanks, Wall!



#4 Shane P

Shane P

    Looks good to me

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 902 posts
337
  • LocationOklahoma City

Posted 26 September 2017 - 10:20 AM

3. add something heavy to the production gun magazine — the USPSA rules does not forbid such mods?

 

It does not necessarily forbid such additions, however there are limitations.  You'll have to worry about total size of the gun/magazine combination, which must fit in the "box", and also have to worry about total weight, which can only be 2 oz. heavier that what is listed in the approved list.



#5 Mitch Gibson

Mitch Gibson

    The white Morgan Freeman

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,915 posts
1,304
  • LocationOKC

Posted 28 September 2017 - 10:19 PM

Work on your grip.

You need to be using a grip exerciser a few days a week, and then when dryfiring work on establishing consistent grip pressure. You need to grip the gun hard, and be able to maintain that grip pressure for a prolonged period.
#dicksoutforHarambe

#6 Robbie

Robbie

    9 mm

  • Founding Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 326 posts
136
  • LocationStillwater

Posted 08 October 2017 - 10:25 PM

1.  I load my magazines to 10 no matter how many rounds the stage requires, and I do the same when I dry fire because I want the weight of the gun to be consistent.

 

2.  Pick a bullet that works well in your gun, that you can afford, and that feels good to you.  Lots of people shoot 147's with Glocks, but they don't work well with every gun.

 

3.  You can add 2 oz to your production gun's listed weight, whether it's in a magazine basepad, a tugsten or stainless steel guide rod, or a grip plug that is flush with the profile of the gun.  Making your gun heavier helps a little bit and isn't a bad idea, but 2 oz isn't much weight, about the same as 4-5 loaded 147gr rounds.  Most people replace their recoil spring assembly with something that will accept aftermarket springs so they can adjust the recoil spring to fit their preference.  That's the simple way to add weight to your gun, and putting weight in the front of the gun helps to reduce rotation during recoil more than putting weight in the magazine.

 

 

Also, Mitch is completely right.  Spending 10 minutes a day working on your grip and doing dry fire will be 100x more beneficial to your score than doing all of this stuff.


Robbie Daugherty
A62501





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users