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Yury's shooting log


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#1 yury

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Posted 11 November 2017 - 02:17 PM

A midlife crisis is coming … Alright, alright, alright. The doctor said that somebody needs some type of sport activity, especially for a guy who sits behind a computer screen most of his life. So I decided to try shooting, with absolutely no prior experience, as a sport in the summer of 2016. There was nobody who can introduce me to the shooting, so I gave myself time to find more about it and whether it is for me. The choices were: USPSA, Steel Challenge, Skeets/Sporting Clays, 3gun, Bullseye. After one year of some researches and trials the choices was made, the baseline was set and the goals were defined.


USPSA and Steel Challenge are fun and easy to enter (in terms of required equipment). I decided to start at the Production Division: there are less thinking in what tuning needs to be done to the gun or equipment, and at the same moment, more basic skills (such as recoil control, reloading, planning) are required. My thinking is: whatever I’ll improve in my training towards USPSA competitions will assist with other shooting discipline choices above.


I prefer to improve myself hence this shooting log to track my progress. I hope somebody will find notes here useful to reach their goals faster.



#2 yury

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Posted 11 November 2017 - 02:19 PM

Here is my baseline and what made the local USPSA and Steel Challenge competitions more enjoyable for me.

 

To this moment, I fully adopted the thumbs forward grip, isosceles stance, and symmetrical draw stroke. I removed or trying to remove all unneeded movement/actions from any routine and/or replacing them with familiar movements on a line of fire: made “make ready” command look similar to draw and magazine reloading procedure, replaced slide stop lever push with regular racking, etc. A dry-fire practice needs to be free from unneeded movements as well: at the moment trying to avoid pressing a par-timer start button (I have caught myself subconsciously reaching for it :).


I need to allocate about 140 min per week for dry-fire session to notice any improvement. It’s about 20-30 min per day. I'm trying to mix two of the following exercises per session: white wall, draw, trigger slap, reload during movement, Hopkins drills; and on occasions: to replace snap caps with laser cartridge to observe light movements during striker hit; to remove par timer to better concentrate on movements; to use of one hand; to add malfunction clearing. I think the above helped me with indexing (point shooting) and, because of that, shooting with both eyes opened.


During live-fire practice, I’m trying to use the same equipment, to load the same amount of rounds per magazine and the same exact ammunition as during competitions. To not forget how to keep a grip during recoil, I have to use about 150 rounds per week at shooting range, and it requires way more than that to make some improvements. Yes, the hardest thing is a grip -- it is impossible to simulate recoil during dry-fire. But it is getting better with time, and few adjustments (after some advice).


Measurable goals? With my 2s draw, 0.8s splits, and 6” groups (at 10 yards), it is hard to expect good results on classifiers yet. However I really hope to reach 1.80s draw, 0.45s splits and 3.5” group somehow by the end of next year.



#3 yury

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Posted 12 November 2017 - 09:06 PM

Started using http://async5.org/beep/ as a par timer -- there is no need to press a button to start cycle again.



#4 yury

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Posted 18 December 2017 - 10:37 AM

Date 528. Looked at the past three months, when I started log my training sessions. 1745 minutes spent on dry-fire training (draw, reload, Hopkins drill, simple movements), and about 2700 rounds used for various activities (indoor range, competitions). That's about 135 minutes per week on dry-fire training. It's really hard to measure the progress: I tried to measure using (Match %), but those PCC guys keep improving too. I probably need to pick some set of M and A shooters in the Production division and compare against them instead.

 

The movements training with Kita has been a blast. The best thing was to try things you see people do, but too afraid to try it yourself, e.g. running full speed back or sideways, or engaging targets on the move. In some case speed gains can be achieved by not doing some thing, e.g. standing reloads or speed up on steel/hard targets. I saw some time improvements in recent matches too, yay!

 

Next several month, I decided to follow a suggestion to further simplify dry-fire training: remove par timer (just beep) and limit training to three basic drills (reload, draw, transition). A live-fire is now strictly limited to Bill drill too -- I want to see splits time changing (which is not).



#5 yury

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Posted 22 January 2018 - 08:34 AM

Day 573. I counted myself as a person who shoots fast but inaccurate. After reviewing a few of my last USPSA matches, I found out that it is not all true. Amount of the points (not stage points) more or on the par with shooters who beats me in the same division -- it's a stage time that bites me. 50%-100% slower in comparison with most of the shooters in the division. So I'm trying to find where/when the time is lost.

 

 

The first idea is poppers and swingers. I pretty much know how fix repeated shots at poppers: more time with sights (a popper is a hard target) and better grip. At the last SCSA I was accurate from first time in 79% of the shots (counted via extra rounds used). Improving that number might reduce time spent on follow up shoots and improves transition-from-popper time due to the confidence of hitting it from the first time. I'm not sure yet what to do about waiting on swingers.



#6 yury

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Posted 19 February 2018 - 07:39 PM

Finally… I barely snatched C from the jaws of the USPSA (and SCSA) classifiers. This took way longer and harder than I anticipated (mostly due to my laziness). The recipe was simple, during frequent dry fire sessions:
- stop chasing quick par times for draw;
- practice standing reload — reload during move is not yet important;
- and work on transitions on the El Prez target array -- eyes first, then sights.

The next stop is B. It’s where I need to fix disconnect between live fire and dry fire. Also, one handed shooting sucks -- it takes forever to put sights back on the target after the shot.



#7 Wall

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Posted 20 February 2018 - 11:31 AM

Finally… I barely snatched C from the jaws of the USPSA (and SCSA) classifiers. This took way longer and harder than I anticipated (mostly due to my laziness). The recipe was simple, during frequent dry fire sessions:
- stop chasing quick par times for draw;
- practice standing reload — reload during move is not yet important;
- and work on transitions on the El Prez target array -- eyes first, then sights.

The next stop is B. It’s where I need to fix disconnect between live fire and dry fire. Also, one handed shooting sucks -- it takes forever to put sights back on the target after the shot.

Congrats Yury

#8 Rick Howell

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Posted 20 February 2018 - 07:31 PM

Finally… I barely snatched C from the jaws of the USPSA (and SCSA) classifiers. This took way longer and harder than I anticipated (mostly due to my laziness). The recipe was simple, during frequent dry fire sessions:
- stop chasing quick par times for draw;
- practice standing reload — reload during move is not yet important;
- and work on transitions on the El Prez target array -- eyes first, then sights.

The next stop is B. It’s where I need to fix disconnect between live fire and dry fire. Also, one handed shooting sucks -- it takes forever to put sights back on the target after the shot.


Good job, Yury. I had noticed you making quite a bit of progress!!




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