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Redding competition dies for pistols


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#1 btaylor1505

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Posted 27 December 2017 - 09:13 PM

Anyone have experience with Redding Competition dies for pistols? Are they worth the extra money to have the micrometer? I use hornady dies now and considering switching.
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#2 Rick Howell

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Posted 29 December 2017 - 08:45 AM

Anyone have experience with Redding Competition dies for pistols? Are they worth the extra money to have the micrometer? I use hornady dies now and considering switching.


I run their competition seating dies. The micrometer is great when making changes to the overall length of the loaded round. If you swap bullet types often or juggle OAL for different guns, that by itself is worth it. I think the sliding bullet seating chamber is worth just as much as the micrometer. It “takes control” of bullet quicker in the stroke and guides it smoother to its destination.

I liked mine enough I bought a second to setup on an additional machine. Now I have 4 or 5 of them. I’ve only bought the single die instead of the sets on the additional purchases.

Forster makes a similar die, but I’ve only owned them in rifle calibers. I’m not sure is they make it in pistol calibers.

#3 btaylor1505

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Posted 30 December 2017 - 06:52 PM

I run their competition seating dies. The micrometer is great when making changes to the overall length of the loaded round. If you swap bullet types often or juggle OAL for different guns, that by itself is worth it. I think the sliding bullet seating chamber is worth just as much as the micrometer. It “takes control” of bullet quicker in the stroke and guides it smoother to its destination.
I liked mine enough I bought a second to setup on an additional machine. Now I have 4 or 5 of them. I’ve only bought the single die instead of the sets on the additional purchases.
Forster makes a similar die, but I’ve only owned them in rifle calibers. I’m not sure is they make it in pistol calibers.


Thanks for the info Rick. I think more and more that they would be a good investment.
"If you're going through hell, keep going" - Winston Churchill

Don't just finish strong....finish epic!

#4 Josh Cobb

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Posted 31 December 2017 - 07:26 AM

I run their competition seating dies. The micrometer is great when making changes to the overall length of the loaded round. If you swap bullet types often or juggle OAL for different guns, that by itself is worth it. I think the sliding bullet seating chamber is worth just as much as the micrometer. It “takes control” of bullet quicker in the stroke and guides it smoother to its destination.

I liked mine enough I bought a second to setup on an additional machine. Now I have 4 or 5 of them. I’ve only bought the single die instead of the sets on the additional purchases.

Forster makes a similar die, but I’ve only owned them in rifle calibers. I’m not sure is they make it in pistol calibers.


I second this. These are the best dies on the market!


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#5 btaylor1505

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Posted 31 December 2017 - 03:17 PM

I second this. These are the best dies on the market!
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Thanks
"If you're going through hell, keep going" - Winston Churchill

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#6 Definitely Deplorable

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Posted 03 January 2018 - 09:53 AM

One thing to note about Redding is that they have their roots in benchrest and they make their dies to tight tolerances. This is both good and bad in certain instances. I had to send a .38 profile crimp die up there to be polished out a bit because it would swage down the lead bullets I was loading which are normally larger dia. It was perfect for jacketed. But they did it at no charge and had it back to me in a matter of days and I liked that the guy that was corresponding on email and phone with me is the one that actually went into the shop and did the work, so nothing lost in communication. Redding is my first choice when I'm looking for new dies.

#7 btaylor1505

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Posted 03 January 2018 - 05:33 PM

[quote name="Definitely Deplorable" post="253799" timestamp="1514994784"]One thing to note about Redding is that they have their roots in benchrest and they make their dies to tight tolerances. This is both good and bad in certain instances. I had to send a .38 profile crimp die up there to be polished out a bit because it would swage down the lead bullets I was loading which are normally larger dia. It was perfect for jacketed. But they did it at no charge and had it back to me in a matter of days and I liked that the guy that was corresponding on email and phone with me is the one that actually went into the shop and did the work, so nothing lost in communication. Redding is my first choice when I'm looking for new dies.

More pros than cons from what I have heard and read so far. Now to find them for the caliber I will be using them for. Thanks.
"If you're going through hell, keep going" - Winston Churchill

Don't just finish strong....finish epic!




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