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Thinking of doing a 2-3 day survival trip


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#1 EZ Bake

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Posted 10 January 2012 - 01:57 PM

I've been thinking about it for a while now, and now that I'm sort of settling back into my routine, I'm considering (this spring, when the weather gets a little better) doing a 3-day minimalist hike with very little "stuff" to see just how well I can do on my own. I don't know that I'm ready to live 100% off of the land yet, but I want to take some steps towards the goal of really testing my survival abilities.

I've been on 5+ day backpacking hikes, so I'm not new to being in the woods without all the conveniences of car-camping, but I've never had to really "rough it" so to speak (i.e. no water bottle or water-purification system,

Here's my goals:

1. Survive in good health for 2 to 3 days without contact from anyone on the "outside" (I've got a friend that considered doing the same thing, and to be honest for my first time, it might be a good idea to have someone with me just in case something bad happens).

2. Take as little with me as possible (i.e. the list below)

3. Research/learn as much about the area I'll be in before hand (i.e. animal-life, plant-life, environmental/weather conditions, geography, etc)

4. Live as much off the land as I can (obviously, hunting regs/seasons and legal means of taking local plants will come into play)

5. Take a camera with me and photograph or video as much of the trip as I can


Now, as to what to take with me - this has always been my problem. I'm a pack-rat by nature and have always taken more than I need to when backpacking (i.e. more than one set of tweezers, more than 3 knives, duplicates of all my medical supplies, too much food, etc.). I have never needed the additional stuff, so I think this will be a good exercise for me to learn to take as little as possible and just deal with any issues that come up.

So far, I'm torn as to what to take out of my pack (I'm thinking that I'll take one of my tiny camelback packs - especially if I'm taking camera equipment/batteries).

Here's what I've got so far:

Normal EDC items that I would have on me no matter where I was:
- Folding knife of some sort
- Flashlight
- Orange Zippo Lighter
- Para-cord bracelet (don't usually wear one, but I plan on actually dismantling it and using it, so I'm taking one).

Extra Stuff:
- Camera/video camera and equipment (maybe a micro tripod and extra batteries)
- Cell Phone / GPS (I always mark a few waypoints before my trip and then turn off these and stow in pack in-case I get shit-my-pants lost)
- Water bottle
- water purifier / Chlorine tablets / metal cup to boil water with - All 3 places I'm considering have horses or cattle in the direct area that will be using my water-sources (and shitting when they drink). I could really try and rough it by boiling my water over a fire in some sort of make-shift pot, tinfoil, or rock with a chunk out of it, but I'm not sure that I want to go that far just yet (it takes a lot of time to build a fire and bring water to a boil in a pot, and I can't imagine trying to do this with foil or a bowl-shaped rock just yet) and I really don't want to get sick from all the possible bacteria and even a few possible viruses.
- Rain Pancho (to use to make some sort of shelter in-case I just can't do it with sticks/leaves/para-cord)
- Small emergency kit (this is a kit that I take with me on short hikes - it fits in a Quart Ziplock Freezer bag and contains basic first-aid stuff, a signal mirror, water-proof matches, fishing line/hook, meds, etc.)
- Possibly some emergency food (just in case).


I've been reading a little bit about making traps and making fishing poles, etc out of what I have available (and I've made a trap or two just playing around while camping - it is definitely a lot harder than it looks on TV and the results are rarely as good as you'd expect). I could probably learn what plants are ok to eat and which are not in the particular area I'm going to.

One thing that scares me is walking into someone's marijuana patch, meth lab or still. Most of the places I want to go are in very open areas that don't particularly have a huge budget for law-enforcement or game wardens to be patrolling around - so safety is definitely a concern (and pre-planning and notification to all the local folks before hand).

Any thoughts? Does it seem like I'm taking too much crap to call it a "survival trip"?

#2 Thumper

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Posted 10 January 2012 - 03:54 PM

Sounds like fun! What areas are you considering for this trip?

I did several trips like this when I was in high school and college but it's been awhile.

It's probably best for the first trip to take a little more stuff (ie camping light). You may set a goal to not use certain items except under stringent emergency circumstances. I would think bare essentials for a first trip like this might include: means of making fire, means of making water safe, shelter (minimally the right clothing)... Minimal food (you're not going to starve in 3 days), some first aid, phone, compass, means of protection (ie boomstick).

-Paul

#3 Burk Cornelius

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Posted 10 January 2012 - 03:59 PM

Paul you wouldn't be able to "survive" without a Starbucks, would you?

I once had an awkward moment, just to see how it felt.

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#4 Thumper

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Posted 10 January 2012 - 04:19 PM

Burk, I haven't seen you in months and this is the love I get?!?!?!? :-)

I might surprise you how long I could make it... with very little... and no starbucks.

We used to do trips like this for a 5-10 days at a time when I was younger. No food, Just a knife, boomstick, means to boil and hold water, means to make fire. We probably were a little too minimalist at the time but it was a lot of fun.

-Paul

#5 Burk Cornelius

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Posted 10 January 2012 - 05:14 PM

Just a knife, boomstick, means to boil and hold water, means to make fire.


who are you, Bear Grylls?









PS: I've got a new favorite cajun place

I once had an awkward moment, just to see how it felt.

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#6 Thumper

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Posted 10 January 2012 - 06:28 PM

who are you, Bear Grylls?

I'm your Huckleberry. :-)







PS: I've got a new favorite cajun place



#7 J.P. Morgan

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Posted 10 January 2012 - 08:03 PM

Bear learned everything he knows from the Thump man. When I go walkabout as we refer to it back home, I take my hat and a knife. What else do you need?
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#8 Mitch Gibson

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Posted 10 January 2012 - 09:11 PM

Bear learned everything he knows from the Thump man. When I go walkabout as we refer to it back home, I take my hat and a knife. What else do you need?


Something tells me you never go without a visor cap of some sort. And an OU logo.
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#9 Jesse Tischauser

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Posted 11 January 2012 - 04:19 AM

Good luck man! I don't think taking extra stuff is a bad thing. Just use what you feel necessary.

#10 shootingbuff

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Posted 11 January 2012 - 12:09 PM

Way to much stuff for survival since you are planning this. :-\ I Too am a packrat. Here is what I would add. Non folding knife, alternate fire starter besides lighter and matches to practice though have those two as well. Some type of tender just in case, a candle, coffee filters, broth or soup packet and a quick clot and an ace bandage just in case.

Non folding knife is easier/safer to chop and dig with plus make a spear. Starting fires can be a royal pain. Candle to help with warmth or fire. Coffee filters to strain any water to get the the big stuff out of it. Soup or broth just in case. First aid items becasue you will be alone. I would also have an ice pac. and change of socks - no need to get blisters - this is just practice. Oh a plastic bag to carry stuff in like plants, berries, water or to help stay warm, pillow etc.

Now. becasue you have it doesn't mean you will need to use it. Like your GPS. Better to have and not need then need and not have.

Oh and TP becasue I can not do with out (have had to so I know!) and can be used for fires or even marking, notes warmth, pillow etc.
Jerry

A CCW isn't a totem, nor does it magically fiend off the bad element. Furthermore, a CCW is of no use if you can not employ said CCW.

BLUF:
You still have to hit the target.
One Shot Stop = locomotive with the target tied across the tracks.
Staying alive means you are aware, mentally prepared, proficient and fast in liberally applying proper shot placement.


Have you thanked a LEO, Firefighter, Medical / other emergency service worker, and least we forget the military lately?

#11 EZ Bake

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Posted 11 January 2012 - 09:34 PM

I'm looking at a couple of different locations:

Ozark National Forest
Ouchita National Forest
Mark Twain National Forest
Big Spring
Honobia / 3-Rivers WMA
Palo Duro Canyon, (Amarillo, TX)

Couple of other actual Wilderness spots that aren't national forests/parks (that are more open with me lighting a fire outside of designated areas) - but I have to travel pretty far, and I'm not doing SW TX or Louisiana - I'm not down with the gators and what not.

Some state parks as well for smaller stuff - I can basically get completely around Robber's Cave's outermost trails and circle the park in a day though (same with Red Rock Canyon), so I'd need more space than most around here offer. Some in Arkansas are cool - but I'm closer to civilization than I'd like to be for this type of trip.

Shootingbuff - you sound just like me - I'm trying to prove that I can un-packrat it this time though man :)

I planned on adding a fixed-blade knife (I can't believe I left that out up there - I always like having one tiny slicer and a slightly larger fixed-blade for heavy work - I don't believe in doing heavy work with over-built folders). My emergency kit comes with a couple pieces of tender (My wife made some out of wax and dryer lent - she was a GirlScout leader for a while). I can generally start a fire in pretty bad conditions (I'm not going to be in a serious storm or freezing temps if I can help it - granted, we are in Oklahoma). My emergency kit has a roll of vet-wrap and some gauze that usually works better than ace bandages for me.

When I backpack, I usually have a handkerchief with me that I use to sediment-filter water so it doesn't gunk up my filter (as well as anything else I need it for), but I'm torn on whether or not to use chlorine tablets/drops or bring an actual filter this time.

I typically take an aluminum or Ti cup with me to cook and drink hot stuff out of when backpacking and I'm wondering if I want to try and boil water this time just to see if I can (with a backup of chlorine or iodine).

The TP is actually a good point - even when roughing it, I rarely go without the booty-wipe, so I've got a pretty difficult choice to make there.

#12 dennishoddy

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Posted 11 January 2012 - 09:58 PM

Well, I've done this lots of times back in the day. It just depends on how primative you want to get. You need just a few items for the basic trip. You need safe water, safe food, and fire.
I could school one on building fire from scratch, but a little toilet paper, 0000 steel wool and a 9 volt battery will get a fire started in a rain storm.
A heavy fixed blade knife is a must. One can take a rock and the knife, and chop down a pretty good sized limb to make firewood. Folders are ok for dressing animals that have been killed.
Learn how to set natural traps, and dead falls to take small game like rabbits, up to deer sized animals.
One can boil water, or buy one of the straws that will work for a week or so if thats going to be the duration of the trip.

BIG TIME ADVICE!! Forget the cell phone, GPS. In a canyon, they will get you lost, and possibly dead. They rely on sattelites, and in a canyon, they can't see one. Learn to use a lensatic compass, and get a topo map of the area. Learn how to navigate using these.
I've used this system to get over 30 miles, travelling at night only, in a different day and time.

Take a big sidearm.

#13 shootingbuff

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Posted 12 January 2012 - 06:52 PM

I'm looking at a couple of different locations:

Ozark National Forest
Ouchita National Forest
Mark Twain National Forest
Big Spring
Honobia / 3-Rivers WMA
Palo Duro Canyon, (Amarillo, TX)

Couple of other actual Wilderness spots that aren't national forests/parks (that are more open with me lighting a fire outside of designated areas) - but I have to travel pretty far, and I'm not doing SW TX or Louisiana - I'm not down with the gators and what not.

Some state parks as well for smaller stuff - I can basically get completely around Robber's Cave's outermost trails and circle the park in a day though (same with Red Rock Canyon), so I'd need more space than most around here offer. Some in Arkansas are cool - but I'm closer to civilization than I'd like to be for this type of trip.

Shootingbuff - you sound just like me - I'm trying to prove that I can un-packrat it this time though man :)

I planned on adding a fixed-blade knife (I can't believe I left that out up there - I always like having one tiny slicer and a slightly larger fixed-blade for heavy work - I don't believe in doing heavy work with over-built folders). My emergency kit comes with a couple pieces of tender (My wife made some out of wax and dryer lent - she was a GirlScout leader for a while). I can generally start a fire in pretty bad conditions (I'm not going to be in a serious storm or freezing temps if I can help it - granted, we are in Oklahoma). My emergency kit has a roll of vet-wrap and some gauze that usually works better than ace bandages for me.

When I backpack, I usually have a handkerchief with me that I use to sediment-filter water so it doesn't gunk up my filter (as well as anything else I need it for), but I'm torn on whether or not to use chlorine tablets/drops or bring an actual filter this time.

I typically take an aluminum or Ti cup with me to cook and drink hot stuff out of when backpacking and I'm wondering if I want to try and boil water this time just to see if I can (with a backup of chlorine or iodine).

The TP is actually a good point - even when roughing it, I rarely go without the booty-wipe, so I've got a pretty difficult choice to make there.


Just saying because you have it you don't. need to use it. No reason to put yourself in harms way.
Great advice on the topo map. Learn resection and intersection and terrain association. A protractor would be useful as well.
Jerry

A CCW isn't a totem, nor does it magically fiend off the bad element. Furthermore, a CCW is of no use if you can not employ said CCW.

BLUF:
You still have to hit the target.
One Shot Stop = locomotive with the target tied across the tracks.
Staying alive means you are aware, mentally prepared, proficient and fast in liberally applying proper shot placement.


Have you thanked a LEO, Firefighter, Medical / other emergency service worker, and least we forget the military lately?

#14 Gunnut 23

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Posted 16 January 2012 - 01:26 AM

man,take a buck knife and a lighter

#15 DJCAREY

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Posted 16 January 2012 - 07:48 AM

You should go to OJAM in March

http://www.okselfbow.com/

2010


2011


#16 dennishoddy

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Posted 16 January 2012 - 11:36 AM

You should go to OJAM in March

http://www.okselfbow.com/

2010



2011


A friend of mine helps put that on. Tommy Leach. I think he just came into the mother load of elk sinew over the weekend. .

#17 shootingbuff

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Posted 16 January 2012 - 03:50 PM

man,take a buck knife and a lighter

Kind of what I meant by stating taking much stuff since this is being planned. That stated Smelly stuff happens and this is just practice. I guess one could be dropped off in the middle of somewhere in the dark with what is in their pockets or routinely carry in their vehicle and told to make do for a week with nothing else. Then we get back to the practice part.
Jerry

A CCW isn't a totem, nor does it magically fiend off the bad element. Furthermore, a CCW is of no use if you can not employ said CCW.

BLUF:
You still have to hit the target.
One Shot Stop = locomotive with the target tied across the tracks.
Staying alive means you are aware, mentally prepared, proficient and fast in liberally applying proper shot placement.


Have you thanked a LEO, Firefighter, Medical / other emergency service worker, and least we forget the military lately?

#18 1OKshooter

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Posted 22 January 2012 - 01:08 AM

I would pack a small backpack and take the normal necessities and leave out the food and drink, The whole point of survival is that you where out having fun and got lost, now it is time to see if you can make it with what you packed for the day, if you want a real challenge have a 12 year old pack what he thinks is important and use that.

#19 okcowboy

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Posted 15 May 2012 - 09:53 PM

Make your paracord braclet like a Slatt's rescue belt. They don't look as 'cool' as the ones that everyone else makes but they come undone soooo much faster. (I had EagleScout on this forum make me some with stainless clevis hooks.)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uGDIm5bcQRM


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#20 Keith Cross

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Posted 19 May 2012 - 10:57 PM

I've been watching this thread from the start and my question is this: Is this practice for a bigger eventuality or is it just a "see if I can do it" kinda thing?
The reason I ask is this: I don't see myself ever being in a situation where I'm stranded in the middle of the woods/forest/jungle/wilderness with nothing but my pocket stuff. This is because I try to plan ahead. I've gotten to where I carry a backpack full of stuff when I go out to work everyday - not a B.O.B. but a "get me home bag." I work by appt. and drive all over the tulsa metro area and beyond (not quite "infinity and beyond", but whatever). Any number of things could happen. In the winter I pack for the possibility that I lose control and slide off the road, causing me to have to hoof it somewhere. In warmer weather I pack as if I might have to abandon the relative comfort and shelter of my work van and try to make it to help or even get home to my family. I therefore carry a lot of stuff, all compressed and contained in a sm-med sized backpack, things that I think will help get me home. Once home I then can begin the survival phase if the situation warrants it.

"Get Home Bag" contents:
Lighter/tinder
Surefire flashlight
Hat
Hunter orange vest, for rescue visibilty
a change of clothes (camo, in case I don't wanna be "rescued")
Clean socks (if you're gonna do a lot of walking you gotta take care of your feet)
My fixed blade
My "EDC" (I'm not legal yet for CCW so I just keep it with me)
A reload for the EDC (and a spare box of ammo, because its not my pocket, its a backpack. Although, if I need that, I'm screwed...)
Working on my IFAK...
Trail mix/protein bars or some sort of "food" item
2-32oz gatorade bottles of water

Still perfecting the list, but its not too heavy of a load to carry if I had to. Practice for me would be dropping me off in Owasso, Claremore, Jenks or something like that with my pack and seeing if I could get home from there in a decent time.




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