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#21 dennishoddy

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Posted 03 December 2012 - 09:17 PM

I'll be there. I saw your location as Enid. The offer still stands for Kaw.

#22 dennishoddy

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Posted 03 December 2012 - 09:23 PM

I'll be the guy at the match in a full gille suit.

#23 dennishoddy

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Posted 03 December 2012 - 10:06 PM

I'm thinking your looking at the wrong license fees. I'll check it out tomorrow and get back with you. Bedtime.

#24 Dustin Cantrell

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Posted 03 December 2012 - 10:23 PM

what kind of license would one need? i was looking at the various types on the ODWC website and some prices were scary. if i need over $300 in licenses i think ill stick to paper!


I'm thinking you had to be looking at nonresident prices. Resident annual hunting is $25, deer tag is $20. I think if you hunt public land you need an additional permit that is $26. Could be wrong on that one, though.

#25 Kevin S.

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Posted 04 December 2012 - 12:56 PM

I'm thinking you had to be looking at nonresident prices. Resident annual hunting is $25, deer tag is $20. I think if you hunt public land you need an additional permit that is $26. Could be wrong on that one, though.



I think you are wrong here, I have hunted public land for a long time and never had to get any extra license. There are some areas around Broken Bow that require a land access permit, but they are owned by a logging company.

That being said, I have a lifetime license so I don't pay as much attention to the license part of the regs.
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#26 Feegee Matlock

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Posted 04 December 2012 - 03:13 PM

I know when I use to take my son fishing around town we had to get a close to home permit that was 5 dollars per day. I think on some of the public land you may need a small fee permit, but I could be wrong.


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#27 Jeff T

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Posted 04 December 2012 - 03:55 PM

I know when I use to take my son fishing around town we had to get a close to home permit that was 5 dollars per day. I think on some of the public land you may need a small fee permit, but I could be wrong.

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Oklahoma City has a permit that is required to fish.
The ODWC says:
"In addition to state fishing license requirements, some municipalities require daily or annual city fishing permits. Check with local officials for details on cost and permit vendor locations. Phone numbers for city offices are listed below."
Here: http://www.wildlifed.../close2home.htm

And then has a link to the OKC Page.
Which says:
"Fishing and boating are available at all three reservoirs. Water skiing and jet skiing are enjoyed at Lake Draper, which is our largest lake. State fishing license and City fishing permit required unless exempt. Boating permit also required."

Here:http://www.okc.gov/lakes/index.html

There are several other locations in OKC that require that "City Fishing Permit"

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#28 dennishoddy

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Posted 04 December 2012 - 04:16 PM

Unless you have a lifetime license for hunting, you are required to purchase a Legacy permit for $5. It's an annual thing. If hunting migratory fowl, you must have a H.I.P. permit. It's free, you just have to have it.

#29 KLG (Kenny Gant)

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Posted 04 December 2012 - 04:40 PM

Unless you have a lifetime license for hunting, you are required to purchase a Legacy permit for $5. It's an annual thing. If hunting migratory fowl, you must have a H.I.P. permit. It's free, you just have to have it.


The legacy permit was incorporated into the hunting and fishing license in 2009.

#30 1000YRDSHOT

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Posted 04 December 2012 - 04:41 PM

Dennis is right about the time and effort involved in gaining permission to hunt private land. It involves a lot of work! It wears me out more than hunting, but it is totally worth it! That brings up the other point Dennis was talking about, the fact that people can jeopardize that trust the landowner has in you. Walking up to a stranger or calling them out of the blue and asking to hunt on the land they use to make a living is a bit nerve racking. You can understand how skeptical they might be, and for good reason. They don't know anything about you other than how you present yourself. For all they know you might play target practice with thier cows or leave the gate open. My point is that you should be polite and respectful to whatever their answer might be...I'm told no 9 times out of 10. Yes it is disheartening, but someone will take a chance on you.

I've had friends loose permission because they drove down a road through a pasture when it was wet, not tearing it up, but noticable enough for the land owner to see it. Something you and I mighy think is trival might be a big deal to the land owner. When you think about what it takes to gain permission, you really notice how much it sucks to loose a spot. I drove 6000 miles during scouting last year, I would bet I talked to 300 people (not all land owners), and I gained access to about 10 different places equaling about 3000 acres. I call and offer to help land owners during the summer. I call them when i find cattle out in the road, even if i know its not theirs. They know their neighbors and will think & speak highly of you. It shows that you aren't just about yourself.

I will write some good tips for scouting when i get to a computer.
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#31 dennishoddy

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Posted 04 December 2012 - 09:56 PM

The legacy permit was incorporated into the hunting and fishing license in 2009.


I have a lifetime, so that one escaped me. Thanks for the update.

#32 dennishoddy

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Posted 04 December 2012 - 10:08 PM

Dennis is right about the time and effort involved in gaining permission to hunt private land. It involves a lot of work! It wears me out more than hunting, but it is totally worth it! That brings up the other point Dennis was talking about, the fact that people can jeopardize that trust the landowner has in you. Walking up to a stranger or calling them out of the blue and asking to hunt on the land they use to make a living is a bit nerve racking. You can understand how skeptical they might be, and for good reason. They don't know anything about you other than how you present yourself. For all they know you might play target practice with thier cows or leave the gate open. My point is that you should be polite and respectful to whatever their answer might be...I'm told no 9 times out of 10. Yes it is disheartening, but someone will take a chance on you.

I've had friends loose permission because they drove down a road through a pasture when it was wet, not tearing it up, but noticable enough for the land owner to see it. Something you and I mighy think is trival might be a big deal to the land owner. When you think about what it takes to gain permission, you really notice how much it sucks to loose a spot. I drove 6000 miles during scouting last year, I would bet I talked to 300 people (not all land owners), and I gained access to about 10 different places equaling about 3000 acres. I call and offer to help land owners during the summer. I call them when i find cattle out in the road, even if i know its not theirs. They know their neighbors and will think & speak highly of you. It shows that you aren't just about yourself.

I will write some good tips for scouting when i get to a computer.


Very good observation about what it takes to get into private ground.
If I ever put a $ figure into what I put out every year to maintain the primo ground I get to hunt now, nobody would believe me, but Deer hunting is what I do, its my passion, and I'll do pretty much what it takes to make it happen. I put in food plots for his kids, watch over the property for him, help with poachers and whatever else that is needed.
Spotted a broken window in the hunting cabin last year. Wasn't much, but cracked pretty good.
A week or two later, he called and asked if I knew who fixed the window.
His hired hand folded up a post hole drill on the back of his tractor. I fixed it.
I'm also a land owner. Unfortunatly for me, mine is all farm land, so I hunt on him.
One of the benefits is that once you have established yourself with the land owner, the neighbors learn that you can be trusted, and amazingly enough, will allow sombody to hunt on them as well.

#33 Dux-R-Us

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Posted 07 December 2012 - 04:47 PM

. I drove 6000 miles during scouting last year, I would bet I talked to 300 people (not all land owners),


Only students and post-docs have that much time to devote to bird-dogging places to hunt. :)

Your frequency of success (10/300 = 3%) is low but not unrealistic. My best advice is to marry someone that owns land or is extremely wealthy.

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#34 Dux-R-Us

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Posted 07 December 2012 - 04:55 PM

IN this country, hunting as a hobby for the poor and middle class is dying. It is fast becoming a business that caters to the wealthy and elite.

"Give me three chances and I can do anything."  -  KAS


#35 dennishoddy

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Posted 07 December 2012 - 08:12 PM

IN this country, hunting as a hobby for the poor and middle class is dying. It is fast becoming a business that caters to the wealthy and elite.

I don't deny that one bit. As a landowner, I can see one side of leasing ones property, but on the other hand, the days of knocking on a door to get permission to hunt for free, is quickly becoming a thing of the past. I hate that, but like I've said before, 90% of the time, the landowner has family that wants to use the land.
I have some contacts at the ODW, and have been beating them to death to start a Walk-In program like Kansas.
The state leases the land, from the landowner and puts out maps to the public. Just google Kansas hunting.
The public hunts it for free. Some of it is marginal, but some is really good. Early season pheasants are typically fantastic, but even on the last weekend last season we took a limit of birds.
Took walking about a cazillion miles, but if one wants to kill a bird, thats what you have to do. BTW, the best spot we found was not in the walk-in program, but was given to us by a local farmer that had a flat on his feed truck. He was about 80 something. We changed his tire for him, and were leaving. He offered to pay us, but we wouldn't take any money. He knew we were hunting pheasant, and gave us directions to a quarter section that turned into a gold mine.
The same thing can happen in Ok. One has to nurture a relationship with the landowner somehow, and make yourself more valuable to be there than to be ran off.
Offer to help at harvest, drive a tractor at planting....the list never stops.

#36 Dux-R-Us

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Posted 08 December 2012 - 04:38 PM

Took walking about a cazillion miles, but if one wants to kill a bird, thats what you have to do. .


Have your read Thursday's Bird by Joel Springer? It is about pheasant hunting. If not you'd enjoy it.

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#37 Sam Shoun

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Posted 10 December 2012 - 10:37 AM

IN this country, hunting as a hobby for the poor and middle class is dying. It is fast becoming a business that caters to the wealthy and elite.


I've noticed this too, and I've been hoping to learn to hunt with a "low tech" approach and rely on my willingness to walk a long way or go to physically demanding places on public land that others will not... If such places exist in OK.

I certainly can't afford the baffling figures I hear some spend on the sport.
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#38 dennishoddy

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Posted 10 December 2012 - 12:13 PM

Have your read Thursday's Bird by Joel Springer? It is about pheasant hunting. If not you'd enjoy it.


I haven't but will. My wife just bought a kindle Fire. I'll see if it's available on here before buying the book.




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