Modifications for Production and Limited Division

Jared Lyden

Well-Known Member
I know this question is probably going to be a stupid one, but I will ask anyways. I was wondering if anyone knew of the modifications that could be made to my gun in Production and Limited Divisions. I am looking at buying a G35 for Limited Division and G17 for the Production class.

Sometimes the requirements are a little hard to follow on USPSA website. Also I was wondering what they mean by installed flashlight. Does this mean you can shoot a gun with or without a tac light on your gun. This is unclear to me.

Thanks,
Go Noles.
 

Jared Lyden

Well-Known Member
Would these modifications work for the following divisions.

Production Gun
Glock 17 Gen 4
Sight: Fiber Optic Sight
Grip: Grip Tape
Spring Kit and Guide Rod
Connecter
Grip Plug
Adjustable Trigger Stop
Factory Extended Mag Release (Not Metal)
Magazine Base Pad (Not for more rounds, but for grip)
Barrel (Not Ported)

Limited Gun
Glock 35 Gen 4
Sight: Fiber Optic Sight
Trigger: Competition Trigger
Striker:
Barrel: ( Not Ported)
Extended Mag Release ( Not Metal)
Grip: Grip Tape
Mag Well:
Competition Spring Kit:
Adjustable Trigger Stop:
Recoil Spring
Guide Rod
Magazine Extensions: (140mm total length)
 

Airic

I shoot.
That all looks good. Make sure that adjustable trigger stop is the type thats only a small screw in the trigger mechanism housing, not anything visable from the outside.

On the limited gun I really like the SJC magwell, its huge and feels like it locks your hand on the gun.
 

Jared Lyden

Well-Known Member
Eric Gambill said:
That all looks good. Make sure that adjustable trigger stop is the type thats only a small screw in the trigger mechanism housing, not anything visable from the outside.

On the limited gun I really like the SJC magwell, its huge and feels like it locks your hand on the gun.
So my next question is. In Limited Division can you have your belt setup any way you want it or does have to be like it is in Production class.
 

Jared Lyden

Well-Known Member
R.Pullicar.jr said:
That's a lot of money tied up in two glocks that you will want to get rid of in less than a year.
I see what were you thinking, I am always open to new ideas. The reason for the glock is because that is what, I'm used to due it being my duty weapon.
 

Squid

Well-Known Member
R.Pullicar.jr said:
That's a lot of money tied up in two glocks that you will want to get rid of in less than a year.
I agree here. Start with a glock 17 production rig then move to limited in a year or two if you want. You don't have to shoot limited to have a good time. there is plenty of good competition in production. And if you decide to sell that glock my personal opinion is that a 17 will sell easier than a 34.
 

Jared Lyden

Well-Known Member
Do most of you think it would just be easier to shoot limited or should I really start out in Production. After doing some research, it looks like with Limited you can buy some high quality guns that are ready to rock and roll right out the gate. What do you think?
 

Wild Bill

Well-Known Member
If you suck at stage planning id go limited. Plus, you can buy a better pistol so you can make up for lack of skill. I still can't find a pistol that does that...
 

wav3rhythm

Well-Known Member
So I started shooting USPSA a little over a year ago. And had some very similar questions... Lots of people gave me the following advice. Here's my 2 cents / consolidated advice from others:

1) Pick one division and shoot it consistently. Switching guns, divisions, gear is expensive and will slow down your development in USPSA.

2) Production is a great place to start. It teaches gun handling skills and the limited capacity forces reloads. It forces accuracy to do well - minor power factor scoring is universal for production. It forces you to really work on your stage plans because you have so many additional factors to think about. It also will help build trigger control if you want to shoot most of the guns.

3) Don't go crazy on the gun and gear. Glocks are a great entry gun. They are reliable and offer a very good price point - in fact most shooters have to spend hundreds to get them to malfunction a lot. You will make much more significant gains by doing routine, organized dry fire (look at the Ben Stoeger or Steve Anderson books).

4) You never get your money out of upgrades and accessories. Shoot matches and play with other people's guns before you invest heavily.

5) Reload your own ammo.

Hope some of this helped. If not, it'll at least bump your post up for someone to provide useful information.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

drmitchgibson

The white Morgan Freeman
Use your Production gun to shoot Limited and fill up the magazines. After you get comfortable, try Production. Then pick a division and stick with it for a long while.
 

Glock_21

Well-Known Member
Josh Cobb said:
So I started shooting USPSA a little over a year ago. And had some very similar questions... Lots of people gave me the following advice. Here's my 2 cents / consolidated advice from others:

1) Pick one division and shoot it consistently. Switching guns, divisions, gear is expensive and will slow down your development in USPSA.

2) Production is a great place to start. It teaches gun handling skills and the limited capacity forces reloads. It forces accuracy to do well - minor power factor scoring is universal for production. It forces you to really work on your stage plans because you have so many additional factors to think about. It also will help build trigger control if you want to shoot most of the guns.

3) Don't go crazy on the gun and gear. Glocks are a great entry gun. They are reliable and offer a very good price point - in fact most shooters have to spend hundreds to get them to malfunction a lot. You will make much more significant gains by doing routine, organized dry fire (look at the Ben Stoeger or Steve Anderson books).

4) You never get your money out of upgrades and accessories. Shoot matches and play with other people's guns before you invest heavily.

5) Reload your own ammo.

Hope some of this helped. If not, it'll at least bump your post up for someone to provide useful information.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Very similar situation for me.

I started out shooting production with a Gen 2 G17. I added three of the Taran Tactical +6 base pads and now I shoot limited minor with the same Gen 2 G17. The same pistol also serves me well in 3 Gun. I will probably add a limited gun of some sort in the near future and shoot major.
 

Scott_S

Well-Known Member
I started with the gun I had - Single stack 1911. I'm a C shooter there. I have recently purchased a 2011 for limited competition.

With your glock being able to shoot in both production and limited I'd try them both out and see what you like most.
 

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