Starting Budget?

Jonathan Waits

New Member
So I want to get into backpacking or truck camping even, and I was wondering what would be a good starting budget for gear and what not? 2k per person? Or can one be outfitted for less?
 

Dustin Cantrell

New Member
$2k?! Camping out of a vehicle can be very cheap. Backpacking gear might cost a bit more due to lightweight gear costing more. But, there is no reason to spend $2k on gear.
 

Jonathan Waits

New Member
ah, well its just I see these packs for like 150 bucks, then the sleeping bags are like 100 bucks, etc, tents probably arent cheap either, I have watched a few "what to pack" videos etc, and it seems like they have over a thousand bucks worth of equipment just for themselves.
 

Dustin Cantrell

New Member
$1k to start would probably be more reasonable. I'm not an expert. I think the type of backpacking you plan on doing should determine the gear you buy and therefore the associated cost. Backpacking here in OK would need different and probably less expensive gear than backpacking mountains in an arctic climate.
 

Ksmirk

New Member
Since I got my RZR we have been kicking the idea of doing some camping just packing everything in the RZR's and go and I've been really confused about some things as to do I really NEED that? there are so many different ideas from different people and believe it or not there is not that much room in a RZR to pack stuff. I feel your pain. Later,

Kirk
 

scubor2

S.L.C.G.A.
If you are thinking about backpacking ask an Eagle Scout who has been to Philmont a few times. After a week or two at a time in the woods they can tell you what works and what doesn't.
 

Jonathan Waits

New Member
Yeah, that's the one camp I didn't get to go to. I hear they have waiting lists now and troops have to get in line years in advance.
 

dennishoddy

Moderator
Back in the day, I was a wannabe mountain man in the flat lands of Oklahoma. Read every thing I could read about trapping, survival,etc.

you can camp/survive with nothing other than your skills if you have them.

Recent technology makes it easier, but what would you do if you were the only survivor in an airplane crash? GPS units don't work in valley's as they can't see the satts.



If one is on a personal hiking trip into the wilderness, you have to learn/already know how to get water from plants, trap and kill game, prepare a heated sleeping place, and the story goes on.
When you get hungry, its amazing what a person will eat. Went through the US Army survival school. I know this.
 

Bob Sanders

Well-Known Member
I think for hard core camping, like you see in the outdoor magazines, pretty specialized gear is in order. If you're just wanting to head out for a weekend in the woods, you can probably do pretty well with Walmart stuff. You probably have a lot of stuff already. I don't primitive camp much, but I do ride horses in the wilderness. During those adventures, I always have a compass, and a GPS on my person, NOT in the saddlebags! So, even if you don't plan to go far, have a plan to get back.
 

Jonathan Waits

New Member
So where are some good places in oklahoma for that sort of thing? I mean I have been to robbers cave, but is it big enough to do an overnight hiking trip? Also are there any public places around tishimingo? Similar to slippery falls but public?
 

striped1

New Member
Big considerations are how you are going to travel - foot, car, bike, canoe, how comfortable you want to be, what seasons / weather you are going to camp in and finally, how well you want to eat.
Decent mileage back backing, especially with elevation requires high quality, very lightweight gear.
Canoe camping is best done with packs designed for it - think Granite Gear.
ultimately you are only limited by what you can carry.
Best advise, find a store like REI and try on the gear. If you are hiking up and down mountains or putting on any sort of mileage it has to fit well.
I do a lot of remote, back country canoe camping. I tend to go high end and ultra light but splurge on weight with sleeping pads and some other comfort items. I will eat freeze dried food, but I will also haul in fresh steak, salad for the first night and a box or two of wine to enjoy around the campfire.
$2,000 should set you up pretty well no matter what your method.
 

dennishoddy

Moderator
GamerNxUSN(JonathanWaits) said:
So where are some good places in oklahoma for that sort of thing? I mean I have been to robbers cave, but is it big enough to do an overnight hiking trip? Also are there any public places around tishimingo? Similar to slippery falls but public?
I understand the trails at the Witchita Mountains Wildlife preserve are pretty interesting. There is lots of land in SE Oklahoma that is leased by the state from lumber company's that is open to hiking/camping. Its used for hunting opportunities in the fall.
Most of the Corps of Engineers lakes have hiking trails. Kaw lake in my neck of the woods has a shared equestrian/hiking trail that is about 10 miles long.
 

Jonathan Waits

New Member
What are the fees associated with these places? Do I need use permits? I noticed for robbers cave its 12 bucks for "tent sites" Which I assume that means you cant just camp in the woods?
 

drmitchgibson

The white Morgan Freeman
GamerNxUSN(JonathanWaits) said:
What are the fees associated with these places? Do I need use permits? I noticed for robbers cave its 12 bucks for "tent sites" Which I assume that means you cant just camp in the woods?
Freedom isn't free, haven't you heard?
 

Ksmirk

New Member
I've spent a night or two down in Lawton in the woods lol not 100% by choice just goes to prove you can still get away from everything down there. Take a buddy and your pistol as the big kitties were growing in numbers and that was 8-10 years ago. I know most of the places we go ride RZR's you can hike those trails as well, Cass Ar and around Mena and you could go forever it seems! I know Cass we have been going for about a year and have yet to come close to riding half the trails. Later,

Kirk
 

dennishoddy

Moderator
Almost all public areas have a fee. The Corps of Engineers do not. Google the location you want to visit and see if they have fees.

I forgot about the trails around the Lower Mountain Fork River in SE Oklahoma. Very popular with a 25 mile trail if I remember right.
 
GamerNxUSN(JonathanWaits) said:
So I want to get into backpacking or truck camping even, and I was wondering what would be a good starting budget for gear and what not? 2k per person? Or can one be outfitted for less?
There doesn't seem to be a detailed answer here so I figured I'd pipe up. I backpack by myself and here's what I carry:


backpack: Mine was $100, waterproof ones at full retail can be $350. You need a trash bag if you don't get a waterproof one.

stove system: Mine was a JetBoil Flash, $100, you can find the Zip's for $60 sometimes. Lots of options here but the JetBoils are simple, fast, efficient, and clean. Hardcore guys will mess with liquid fuel stoves and those are complicated and stink if you have an accident.

tent: I use a $220 Clip Flashlight by Sierra designs. I paid about half that because I used to be a dealer. Some people opt for hammocks or bivy sacks if going solo.

sleeping bag: A $60 North Face works fine. I like to go when it's warm and use an ultralight one though, probably got $180 in it but retails for $300. I also use a top of the line Thermarest that is maybe $150.

boots: I actually just use trail running shoes, have had multiple pairs that average maybe $100.

flashlights: I like to use a small $20 head lamp, a $30 Black Diamond lantern, and a long range "what the F was that" light, which is typically a $50 one from Gander Mountain.

knives: I like to carry a Buck 119 special, a Kershaw folder, a mini Ka-Bar, and a landscaping saw that weighs 1 pound. With these I can whittle, chop wood, filet a fish, cut an entire tree down, cut paracord, open food packages, and most anything else you can think of.


That's the major things, and full retail on the high end of things comes to about $1,270 total. And, I could get by with just the 119 and a head lamp if I had to, but it's shiny and I like knives and flashlights, so whatever. That sleeping bag is on the very high end of things, and that's an expensive tent for its size.

You still need small items... personally I like to carry chap stick, paracord, wet wipes, a hotel shampoo bottles worth of dishwashing liquid, toothbrush that is half size, toothpaste obviously, sunglasses, BUG SPRAY, dental floss, and that's about it. I've also recently started using the trekking poles, thought they were gay at first but they really help your back.

If truck camping, alot of this flies out the window, you can get away with much cheaper. Once you start strapping stuff to your back its a whole different thing. You can get a cheap sleeping bag and tent because they're heavier and it won't matter and you don't need a backpack. All the above with extra cold weather clothes, food, and water, weighs 42 pounds. That's usually about as much as you want, less is better. With a truck it don't matter.
 

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